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Home/Articole/CONFESIONAL/Ellen White/Ellen White despre Crăciun şi alte sărbători

Ellen White despre Crăciun şi alte sărbători

Există peste 100 de referiri la Crăciun în scrierile EGW. Le-am turnat aici pe toate în engleză, fiindcă nu am timp să stau să le traduc, dar şi pentru că sunt mai importante în textul lor original. Am scos unele care se repetau, dar s-ar putea să mai fi rămas.

Pastoral Ministry, p. 182.1 (1) span style=”color: black;”>din Manuscrisul 60, 26 dec 1886, o predică a EGW ţinută în sala oficială din Tramelan, Elveţia, cu traducerea lui Jean Vuilleumier:

Christmas should be a special time for bringing gifts to Jesus—Yesterday was Christmas. Did you do as the Wise Men did by offering your gifts to Jesus? Or has the enemy changed the order of things, and directed the worship to himself? The gifts are now bestowed upon friends instead of Him who has made so great a sacrifice for us. All the gifts should flow in another channel, where they could be used in the salvation of men.—The Upward Look, 374. Pastoral Ministry, p. 261.2 (1) —The Review and Herald, December 6, 1887 Christmas3. I have said to my family and my friends, I desire that no one shall make me a birthday or gift, unless it be with permission to pass it on into the Lord’s treasury, to be appropriated in the establishment of missions. BEcho January 1, 1892, par. 20 Christmas, and then the very crisis came when I was at Los Angeles, and there I knew nothing – after I had been speaking on Sunday I didn’t know anything more until two o’clock the next morning, when I found them all working over me – and I didn’t know anything about it, or about what had been done, or anything about it; and then it was that the fullness Ellen White: Woman of Vision, p. 202.10 (57), Ellen noted in a letter to a friend: “My will be spent in seeking Jesus to be a welcome guest in my heart. His presence will drive all the shadows away” (Letter 51, 1880). Ellen White: Woman of Vision, p. 125.2 (57) evening as we were humbling ourselves before God, and earnestly pleading for deliverance, the light of heaven seemed to shine upon us, and I was wrapped in a vision of God’s glory. It seemed that I was borne quickly from earth to heaven, where all was health, beauty, and glory. Strains of music fell upon my ear, melodious, perfect, and enchanting. I was permitted to enjoy this scene awhile before my attention was called to this dark world (Ibid.). Ellen White: Woman of Vision, p. 135.3 (57) Christmas9.Five young people were not present morning, but in response to the appeals of their young friends they too gave their hearts to the Lord, making 18 whose lives were changed during the five eventful days at Washington. Some of them wanted to be baptized without delay, so a hole was sawed in the ice on nearby Millan Pond, and with joy they went forward with this rite. Others waited till spring and warmer weather. Nine of the 18 became church workers in the cause of God, some filling prominent positions. Among them were Eugene, Elmer, and Orville Farnsworth, and their sister Loretta. The latter married A. T. Robinson and led out in developing the Bible instructor ministry. The two Mead children made their contributions, Rose in city mission work and Fred as a literature evangelist leader, and missionary to Africa. Ellen White: Woman of Vision, p. 277.6 (57) Christmas11.“Shall We Have a Tree?”—God would be well pleased if on each church would have a tree on which shall be hung offerings, great and small, for these houses of worship.

[Note: reference is made in this article to current building projects. As the principles set forth in this connection are applicable today, these specific references are left in the article.] Letters of inquiry have come to us asking, Shall we have a tree? Will it not be like the world? We answer, You can make it like the world if you have a disposition to do so, or you can make it as unlike the world as possible. There is no particular sin in selecting a fragrant evergreen and placing it in our churches, but the sin lies in the motive which prompts to action and the use which is made of the gifts placed upon the tree. The Adventist Home, p. 477.1 (1) Christmas as a Holiday—“Christmas is coming,” is the note that is sounded throughout our world from east to west and from north to south. With youth, those of mature age, and even the aged, it is a period of general rejoicing, of great gladness. But what is Christmas, that it should demand so much attention? The twenty-fifth of December is supposed to be the day of the birth of Jesus Christ, and its observance has become customary and popular. But yet there is no certainty that we are keeping the veritable day of our Saviour’s birth. History gives us no certain assurance of this. The Bible does not give us the precise time. Had the Lord deemed this knowledge essential to our salvation, He would have spoken through His prophets and apostles, that we might know all about the matter. But the silence of the Scriptures upon this point evidences to us that it is hidden from us for the wisest purposes. In His wisdom the Lord concealed the place where He buried Moses. God buried him, and God resurrected him and took him to heaven. This secrecy was to prevent idolatry. He against whom they rebelled while he was in active service, whom they provoked almost beyond human endurance, was almost worshiped as God after his separation from them by death. For the very same purpose He has concealed the precise day of Christ’s birth, that the day should not receive the honor that should be given to Christ as the Redeemer of the world—one to be received, to be trusted, to be relied on as He who could save to the uttermost all who come unto Him. The soul’s adoration should be given to Jesus as the Son of the infinite God.1The Review and Herald, December 9, 1884.13.Books as Gifts—While urging upon all the duty of first bringing their offerings to God, I would not wholly condemn the practice of making and New Year’s gifts to our friends. It is right to bestow upon one another tokens of love and remembrance if we do not in this forget God, our best Friend. We should make our gifts such as will prove a real benefit to the receiver. I would recommend such books as will be an aid in understanding the Word of God, or that will increase our love for its precepts. Provide something to be read during these long winter evenings. For those who can procure it, D’Aubigne’s History of the Reformation will be both interesting and profitable. From this work we may gain some knowledge of what has been accomplished in the past in the great work of reform. The Adventist Home, p. 480.3 (1) (85%) —a Time to Honor God—By the world the holidays are spent in frivolity and extravagance, gluttony and display…. Thousands of dollars will be worse than thrown away upon the coming and New Year’s in needless indulgences. But it is our privilege to depart from the customs and practices of this degenerate age; and instead of expending means merely for the gratification of the appetite or for needless ornaments or articles of clothing, we may make the coming holidays an occasion in which to honor and glorify God. 6 The Review and Herald, December 11, 1879. Counsels on Sabbath School Work, p. 143.2 (1) Christmas16.17.Says Cox: “There is no evidence that either at this [the time of Constantine], or at a period much later, the observance was viewed as deriving any obligation from the fourth commandment; it seems to have been regarded as an institution corresponding in nature with , Good Friday, and other festivals of the church.” [Cox’s Sabbath Laws, p. 281.] Counsels on Stewardship, p. 96.6 (1) As the sin of robbing God was presented, the people received clearer views of their duty and privilege in this matter. One brother said that for two years he had not paid his tithes, and he was in despair; but as he confessed his sin, he began to gather hope. “What shall I do?” he asked. I said, “Give your note to the treasurer of the church; that will be businesslike.” He thought that was a rather strange request; but he sat down, and began to write, “For value received, I promise to pay —” He looked up, as if to say, Is that the proper form in which to write out a note to the Lord? “Yes,” he continued, “for value received. Have I not been receiving the blessings of God day after day? Have not the angels guarded me? Has not the Lord blessed me with all spiritual and temporal blessings? For value received, I promise to pay the sum of $571.50 to the church treasurer.” After doing all he could do on his part, he was a happy man. In a few days he took up his note, and paid his tithe into the treasury. He had also made a Christmas donation of $125. Counsels on Stewardship, p. 295.2 (1) Christmas20.21.22.I have said to my family and my frien
ds, I desire that no one shall make me a birthday or
gift, unless it be with permission to pass it on into the Lord’s treasury, to be appropriated in the establishment of missions. 24.The youth should be treated very carefully. They should not be left on to find their own amusement in vanity and pleasure seeking, in amusements which will be detrimental to their spirituality. Parents can control this matter by turning the minds and the offerings of their children to God and His cause and the salvation of souls. The Adventist Home, p. 480.4 (1) Christmas 26.The tree may be as tall and its branches as wide as shall best suit the occasion; but let its boughs be laden with the golden and silver fruit of your beneficence, and present this to Him as your gift. Let your donations be sanctified by prayer. The Review and Herald, December 11, 1879. The Adventist Home, p. 482.3 (1) and New Year celebrations can and should be held in behalf of those who are helpless. God is glorified when we give to help those who have large families to support. Manuscript 13, 1896. The Adventist Home, p. 483.1 (1) Christmas31.Last night the [Eve] celebration was held in the [Battle Creek] Tabernacle, and it passed off well — modestly, solemnly, and with gratitude expressed in everything done and said, because Jesus the Prince of Life had come to our world a babe in Bethlehem to be an offering for sin. He came to fulfill the prediction of the prophets and seers, which He had instructed them to utter to fulfill the counsels of heaven, and in the great mission and work verify His own word. And for this, every soul is under the most solemn obligation and gratitude to God, that Jesus, the world’s Redeemer, has pledged Himself to accomplish the full salvation of every son and daughter of Adam. If they do not accept the heavenly gift, they have only themselves to blame. The sacrifice was ample, wholly consistent with the justice and honor of God’s holy law. The Innocent suffered for the guilty, and this should call forth gratitude full and complete. Reflecting Christ, p. 373.2 (1) The Review and Herald, December 9, 1884. Christmas34.Will every soul before the old year closes put off the old man with his deeds, and put on the new man, Christ Jesus? Let there be no great ambitious stress to buy presents for and New Year’s. Little presents for the children may not be amiss, but the Lord’s people should not spend His money in buying costly presents…. The Lord would have every soul who believes in Christ forming a character that will give him a fitness for the mansions which Christ has gone to prepare for those who in this life keep God’s commandments…. A better kingdom is being prepared for all who are faithful, tried, and sanctified, those who are living constantly on the plan of addition, adding virtue to virtue, and grace to grace. Life Sketches of Ellen G. White, p. 171.4 (1) evening, as we were humbling ourselves before God and earnestly pleading for deliverance, the light of heaven seemed to shine upon us, and I was wrapped in a vision of God’s glory. It seemed that I was borne quickly from earth to heaven, where all was health, beauty, and glory. Strains of mus
ic fell upon my ear, melodious, perfect, and entrancing. I was permitted to enjoy this scene a while before my attention was called to this dark world. Then my attention was called to things taking place upon this earth. [
A portion of the instruction given during this memorable vision, urging the establishment of a health institution by the Seventh-day Adventist denomination, is given in Testimonies for the Church 1:485-495, 553-564.] I had an encouraging view of the case of my husband. ST January 7, 1903, par. 1 ChristmasChristmasChristmas39.We are now nearing the close of another year, and shall we not make these festal days opportunities in which to bring to God our offerings? I cannot say sacrifices, for we shall only be rendering to God that which is his already, and which he has only intrusted to us till he shall call for it. God would be well pleased if on , each church would have a tree on which shall be hung offerings, great and small, for these houses of worship. Letters of inquiry have come to us asking, Shall we have a tree? will it not be like the world? We answer, You can make it like the world if you have a disposition to do so, or you can make it as unlike the world as possible. There is no particular sin in selecting a fragrant evergreen, and placing it in our churches; but the sin lies in the motive which prompts to action, and the use which is made of the gifts placed upon the tree. RH January 3, 1882, par. 1 ChristmasChristmasChristmas41.Every tree in Satan’s garden hangs laden with the fruits of vanity, pride, self-importance, evil desire, extravagance,—all poisoned fruit, but very gratifying to the carnal heart. Let the several churches present to God trees in every church; and then let them hang thereon the fruits of beneficence and gratitude,—offerings coming from willing hearts and hands, fruits that God will accept as an expression of our faith and our great love to him for the gift of his Son, Jesus Christ. Let the evergreen be laden with fruit, rich, and pure, and holy, acceptable to God. Shall we not have such a as Heaven can approve? Thousands of dollars are needlessly spent every year in gifts to each other. That is means lost to God, lost to his cause. It pleases the vanity, encourages pride, creates all kinds of dissatisfaction, murmuring, and complaints, because perhaps the gifts are not just what was desired, not of the high value wanted or expected. is not observed as its name implies it should be. Man has forsaken God in almost everything, and has turned the attention to self. He has left the pure springs of living waters which flow from the throne of God, and hewn out to himself broken cisterns, which can hold no water. God gave man a probation that he might be fitted for heaven. He was to look upward to God, who was to be the soul’s adoration; but talent, skill, and inventive powers are all exercised to make self the supreme object of attention. 42.You that have means, who have been in the habit of making donations to your relatives and friends until you are at a loss to know what to invent that will be new and interesting to them, seek to put your ingenuity to the test, as well as your influence, to see how much means you may gather to advance the work of the Lord. Let your skill and your capacities be employed to make the coming one of intense interest, paying your addresses to the God of heaven in willing, grateful offerings. Follow no longer the world’s customs. Make a break here, and see if this cannot show thousands of dollars flowing into the treasury, that God’s store-house may not be empty. You may not be recompensed on earth, but you will be rewarded in the future life, and that abundantly. Let those who have so long planned for self now begin to plan for the cause of God, and you will certainly have increased wisdom. Let the conscience be enlightened, and the love of truth and of Christ take the place of idolatrous thoughts and love of self. Will you not arise, my Christian brethren and sisters, and gird yourselves for duty in the fear of God, so arranging this matter that it shall not be dry and uninteresting, but full of innocent enjoyment that shall bear the signet of Heaven? I know the poorer class will respond to these suggestions. The most wealthy should also show an interest, and bestow their gifts and offerings proportionate to the means with which God has intrusted them. Let there be recorded in the heavenly books such a as has never yet been seen, because of the donations which shall be given for the sustaining of the work of God and the upbuilding of his kingdom. RH December 9, 1884, par. 1 ChristmasChristmasChristmasChristmas45.Let us so manifest our faith and our love for God and the souls of men, that Jesus and his angels can look down from heaven upon us as a people, and bless us upon the coming and New Year’s. How unworthy we are of all the priceless gifts and the continued mercies with which the Lord blesses us! How marvelous has been the goodness of God to the children of men! And how can we better testify our gratitude to God than by making thank-offerings to him at this time? RH December 11, 1888, Art. A, par. 19 ChristmasChristmas47.The enemy plans that human minds and hearts shall be diverted from God and his cause, to praise and honor one another. God has been left out of the question, and positively dishonored. has been made a day of feasting of gluttony, of selfish indulgence. Now let every family consider this matter in all its bearings. Let the parents place it in all its wonderful significance before their children and friends, and say: “This year we will not expend money in presents upon ourselves, but we will honor and glorify God. We will testify of our gratitude to him who gave his Son to die as our sacrifice, that we might have the gift of eternal life.” Let us show that we appreciate this gift, and respond as far as it is in our power, with thank-offerings. Let us celebrate by remembering God, instead of remembering our friends and relatives with gifts which they do not need. RH December 9, 1890, Art. A, par. 3 ChristmasChristmas49.There is a large field for missionary labor in caring for homeless orphan children. Shall not the love of Christ constrain my brethren and sisters to use the capital intrusted for the purpose of blessing others, in providing for destitute and homeless children? Shall and New Year’s find you enriching yourselves by accepting gifts that you do not need, or will you tell your friends and relatives that you will regard it as a great favor to yourself if they will bestow their gifts on the Orphans’ Home, that needy, homeless little children may thus be cared for, clothed, and fed as God would have them? The blessing of the Lord will surely be bestowed upon all who will deny self, using the means he has lent them in an economical way in providing for themselves, in order that they may provide for those also who are destitute and afflicted. God is testing and proving every soul in this probationary time, that it may be made manifest whether or not his attributes of character are formed within. ST January 4, 1883, par. 5 Christmas51.I see no objection to placing even in our churches
a
or New Year tree bearing fruit in gifts and offerings for the cause of God. We may thus take advantage of the occasion to turn the customary gifts of the season into the right channel. And such a holiday celebration is a useful lesson to our children, teaching them to bestow their gifts in a manner to honor their Redeemer. But when we devote our means and labor to feasting ourselves, we fail to render to God that honor which is his due. ST January 4, 1883, par. 9 Christmas54.Christmas55.If we keep at all, we should show that we understand its significance. Instead of saying by our actions that we are putting Christ out of our minds and hearts, let us testify to men, to angels, and to God, that we remember our Redeemer, by following his example of self-denial for others’ good. ST December 8, 1887, par. 10 Christmas57.The banner of truth is to be unfurled in far-distant countries. The great and testing truths which God has committed to us are to be given to all nations, tongues, and peoples. We invite all, men, women, and children, at the coming to do all that they possibly can do to aid in the accomplishment of this work. Let us throughout our churches unitedly resolve not to make the holidays a time of feasting and selfish gratification. Let us excuse the members of our household from making presents to us. Our time, our money, belongs to God. Every hour, every moment, is precious. Dollars, dimes, and even pennies should be treasured up to aid in bringing souls to Christ and the truth. Shall not every needless ornament, every extravagance, every selfish indulgence, be given up, and all these little outgoes, these tiny streams, flow into the Lord’s treasury? Past pledges should now be canceled, as far as possible. Those who have robbed God in tithes and offerings should come before him and make restitution. And to these let us add our free-will gifts. ST December 8, 1887, par. 16 Christmas59.The wise men have left us an example of what we sho
uld do. Jesus should be the object of our adoration, the recipient of our gifts. It is not man, but our Redeemer, that should be honored. To Him we should offer our praise and gifts and treasures; but instead of this, the world sets its treasures flowing in the channel of self-gratification, and to the honor of men.
gifts are bestowed on our children, on our friends and relatives, and few think of what they can do to show their love and gratitude to God for his great love and compassion upon them. BEcho December 15, 1892, par. 11 Christmas61.Brethren and sisters, what are you going to bring to Jesus as an offering of love? What will you render unto the Lord for all his benefits? Will you show forth the praises of Him who has called you out of darkness into his marvellous light, or will you devote your time and money to self and to pleasure seeking, as though self were the great object of attraction? O, may the coming be the best one you have ever enjoyed, because you have brought gifts to Jesus, and given yourselves and your all without reservation to Him who has given all for you. RH February 27, 1866, par. 20 evening as we were humbling ourselves before God, and earnestly pleading for deliverance, the light of Heaven seemed to shine upon us, and I was wrapt in a vision of God’s glory. It seemed that I was borne quickly from earth to Heaven, where all was health, beauty, and glory. Strains of music fell upon my ear, melodious, perfect, and enchanting. I was permitted to enjoy this scene a while before my attention was called to this dark world. Then my attention was called to things transpiring here upon this earth, which I shall not attempt to relate here, but may give them at some future time. I had an encouraging view of the case of my husband, the particulars of which will be presented hereafter. RH November 21, 1878, par. 2 Christmas64.Thousands of dollars will be worse than thrown away upon the coming and New Year’s in needless indulgences. But it is our privilege to depart from the customs and practices of this degenerate age; and instead of expending means merely for the gratification of the appetite, or for needless ornaments or articles of clothing, we may make the coming holidays an occasion in which to honor and glorify God. RH December 11, 1879, par. 6 day, precious reminder of the sacrifice made in man’s behalf, should not be devoted to gluttony and self-indulgence, thus exalting the creature above the Creator. Let us who are partakers of this great salvation show that we have some appreciation of the gift, by rendering to God our thank-offerings. If we would indulge less in feasting and merriment upon these occasions, and instead make them the means of benefiting humanity, we should better meet the mind of God. It is a pleasure and gratification to exchange gifts with our friends; but are there not nobler and more glorious objects for which we may give our means, and thus do good by shedding light upon the pathway of others? RH December 11, 1879, par. 16 Christmas67.Shall not all these precious tokens of his love call forth a response from us in free-will offerings for his cause? Shall not our heavenly Benefactor share in the tokens of our gratitude and love? Come, brethren and sisters, come with your children, even the babes in your arms, and bring your offerings to God according to your ability. Make melody to him in your hearts, and let his praise be upon your lips. Let us rejoice that our Saviour liveth to make intercession for us in the presence of Jehovah. As a people we have backslidden from God; let us return unto him, and he will return unto us, and will heal all our backslidings. Let us, upon the coming and New Year’s festivals, not only make an offering to God of our means, but give ourselves unreservedly to him, a living sacrifice. RH December 26, 1882, par. 12 Christmas69.In every church, however small, special efforts should be made to show our gratitude to God by bringing our offerings for his cause. Let those who desire a tree make its boughs fruitful with gifts for the needy, and offerings for the treasury of God. And let the children learn the blessedness of giving by bringing their little gifts to add to the offerings of their parents. RH December 26, 1882, par. 18 Christmas71.Some have said to me, “Sr. White, what do you think of this? Is it in accordance with our faith?” I answer them, “It is with my faith.” In Healdsburg, San Francisco, and Oakland, there are many things to attract our children; large sums are expended every year on and New Year’s in purchasing gifts for friends. These gifts are not generally satisfactory; for many receive presents that they do not need, when they would be glad to have some other article; some receive the same article from several different persons; and others receive nothing at all. We have tried earnestly to make the holidays as interesting as possible to the youth and children, while changing this order of things. Our object has been to keep them away from scenes of amusement among unbelievers. Instead of following a selfish custom, and giving to those from whom presents will be expected in return, let us make our offerings to the Lord. This plan has proved successful in many of our churches, and it was a success on this occasion, the donations amounting to $138.00. Thus the new year was opened with offerings to the Giver of all our mercies and blessings. RH December 9, 1884, par. 3 Christmas74.As the twenty-fifth day of December is observed to commemorate the birth of Christ, as the children have been instructed by precept and example that this was indeed a day of gladness and rejoicing, you will find it a difficult matter to pass over this period without giving it some attention. It can be made to serve a very good purpose. The youth should be treated very carefully. They should not be left on to find their own amusement in vanity and pleasure-seeking, in amusements which will be detrimental to their spirituality. Parents can control this matter by turning the minds and the offerings of their children to God and his cause and the salvation of souls. The desire for amusement, instead of being quenched and arbitrarily ruled down, should be controlled and directed by painstaking effort upon the part of the parents. Their desire to make gifts may be turned into pure and holy channels, and made to result in good to our fellow-men by supplying the treasury in the great, grand work for which Christ came into our world. Self-denial and self-sacrifice marked his course of action. Let it mark ours who profess to love Jesus; because in him is centered our hope of eternal life. RH December 9, 1884, par. 8 Christmas76.I entreat you, my brethren and sisters, to make this coming a blessing to yourselves and others. The birth of Jesus was unhallowed by the great men of earth. He was the Majesty of heaven; yet this royal subject had no attendants. His birth was unhonored by the very men he came to our world to save. But his advent was celebrated by the heavenly host. Angels of God, in the appearance of a star, conducted the wise men on their mission in search of Jesus. They came with gifts and costly offerings of frankincense and myrrh, to pay their oblation to the infant king foretold in prophecy. They followed the brilliant messengers with assurance and great joy. The angels passed by the school of the prophets, the palaces of kings, and appeared to the humble shepherds, guarding their flocks by night, upon Bethlehem’s plains. One angel first appeared, clothed with the panoply of heaven; and so surprised and so terrified were the shepherds that they could only gaze upon the wondrous glory of the heavenly visitant with unutterable amazement. The angel of the Lord came to them, and said, “Fear not, for, behold, I bring you tidings of great joy, which shall be unto all people; for unto you is born this day, in the city of David, a Saviour, who is Christ the Lord. And this shall be a sign unto you, Ye shall find the babe wrapped in swaddling clothes, lying in a manger.” No sooner had their eyes become accustomed to the glorious presence of the one angel, than, lo! the whole plain was lighted up with the wondrous glory of the multitude of angels that peopled the plains of Bethlehem. The angel quieted the fears of the shepherds before opening their eyes to behold the multitude of the heavenly host, all praising God, and saying, “Glory to God in the highest; and on earth, peace, good will to men.” RH December 9, 1884, par. 15 Christmas78.The holiday season is at hand, and old and young are studying what they can bestow upon their friends as a token of remembrance. The world at large are devising gifts for earthly friends; shall we not remember our heavenly Benefactor? Will he not be pleased if we show that we have not forgotten him? While multitudes celebrate , there are few who show honor to Christ. The day is devoted to selfish indulgence, and the Redeemer’s great love and sacrifice awaken no response. Let it not be so with us. Let the precious tokens of his love call forth an expression of gratitude in free-will offerings for his cause. RH December 15, 1885, Art. B, par. 2 Christmas80.Our children have learned to regard as a day of rejoicing, and we should find it a difficult matter to pass over this holiday without some attention. It may be made to serve a good purpose. The youth should not be left to find their own amusement in vanity and pleasure-seeking. If parents will make the necessary effort, the minds of the children may be directed to God, to his cause, and to the salvation of souls. Their desire to make gifts may be turned into channels of good to their fellow-men, to sustaining the work which Christ came to do. RH December 15, 1885, Art. B, par. 5 Christmas82.I present before you the European missions as the object of your liberality. These missions are in great need of funds. The work must go forward. Every penny that can be spared should be invested in the cause. Let us see if this cannot show thousands, yes, tens of thousands, of dollars flowing into the treasury. RH December 7, 1886, par. 14 Christmas84.Have we been forgetful of God’s goodness in the past, we have now a precious opportunity to redeem these neglects. Let us upon the coming and New Year’s not only make an offering to him of our means, but give ourselves to him in willing service. To each of us, from the oldest to the youngest, is granted the privilege of becoming workers together with God. Christ is soon to come in the clouds of heaven to reward every one according to his works. To whom will it then be said, “Ye have done what ye could”? RH December 6, 1887, par. 12 Christmas86.We are nearing the close of another year. and New Year’s will soon be here. Let us candidly and carefully review our life during the year that is about to pass, with its burden of history, into eternity, and consider the many tokens we have had of the favor of God in the blessings he has bestowed upon us. The most unspeakable gift which God could bestow upon the world was the gift of his beloved Son. RH December 18, 1888, Art. C, par. 16 Christmas88.Will my brethren now arouse to do their work? The signs reveal to us that “the night cometh, in which no man can work.” The time is coming in which you can neither buy nor sell. That will be a serious time for the people of God. Now you can sell and give alms. Now you can send your treasure before you into heaven, and God calls for your means to advance his cause. Let this -time and the entering in of a new year testify to the zeal of God’s people. There has been a withholding from God of tithes and offerings. The question is asked, “Will a man rob God?” And the answer comes, “Ye have robbed me. But ye say, Wherein have we robbed thee?—In tithes and offerings. Ye are cursed with a curse; for ye have robbed me, even this whole nation.” Wonderful statement, and how true! Shall we humble our souls before God, and confess our sin in robbing him? Shall we be zealous and repent? Shall we redeem the failures of the past? “Bring ye all the tithes into the store-house, that there may be meat in mine house, and prove me now herewith, saith the Lord of hosts, if I will not open you the windows of heaven, and pour you out a blessing that there shall not be room enough to receive it.” Shall we obey God, and bring in all our tithes and offerings, that there may be meat to supply the demands of souls hungering for the bread of life? God invites you to prove him now, as the old year draws to its close, and let the new year find us with God’s treasuries replenished. Let us literally prove the Lord, by bringing all the tithes and offerings into his store house, and let us repent of our robbery toward him. He tells us that he will open the windows of heaven, and pour us out a blessing, that there shall not be room enough to receive it. He pledges his word, “I will rebuke the devourer for your sakes, and he shall not destroy the fruits of your ground; neither shall your vine cast her fruit before the time in the field saith the Lord of hosts” Thus his word is our assurance that he will so bless us that we shall have still larger tithes and offerings to bestow. “Return unto me, and I will return unto you, saith the Lord of hosts.” RH February 19, 1889, par. 2 Christmas90.Robbing God involves the most serious consequences. The soul is placed in peril when this is done; for the blessing of God is withdrawn. About $2,000 was raised to restore tithes and offerings that have been withheld in the past. It has been proposed that these long-withheld tithes and offerings be devoted to the European missions. Nearly $6,000, reckoning the offerings, was thus raised for the foreign mission work. The sympathies of God’s people should be aroused in every church throughout our land, and there should be unselfish action to meet the necessities of different mission fields. Men should testify to their interest in the cause of God by giving of their substance. If such an interest were manifested, the bond of Christian brotherhood would exist and increase in strength between all the members of Christ’s family. This work of faithfully bringing in all the tithes, that there may be meat in the house of God, would supply laborers for both home and foreign fields. Although books and publications upon present truth are pouring out their treasures of knowledge to all parts of the world, yet missionary posts must be established at different points. The living preacher must proclaim the words of life and salvation. There are open fields inviting workers to enter. The harvest is ripe, and the earnest Macedonian cry for laborers is heard from every part of the world. We have no great men to send; but there are many single-hearted sons and daughters of God who will take hold of the work at any place, and God will give them wisdom, if they are meek and lowly followers of Jesus. 92.What matchless love Jesus has manifested for a fallen world! If angels sung because the Saviour was born in Bethlehem, shall not our hearts echo the glad strain, Glory to God in the highest, peace on earth, good will to men? Although we do not know the exact day of Christ’s birth, we would honor the sacred event. May the Lord forbid that any one should be so narrow-minded as to over-look the event because there is an uncertainty in regard to the exact time. Let us do what we can to fasten the minds of the children upon those things which are precious to every one who loves Jesus. Let us teach them how Jesus came into the world to bring hope, comfort, peace, and happiness to all. The angels explained the reason of their great joy, saying, “For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Saviour, which is Christ the Lord.” Then, children and youth, as you celebrate the coming , will you not count up the many things for which you are to be grateful, and will you not present a gratitude offering to Christ, and so reveal that you do appreciate the heavenly Gift? RH December 9, 1890, Art. A, par. 5 Christmas95.Satan’s suggestions are carried out in many, many things. Our birthday anniversaries, and and Thanksgiving festivals, are too often devoted to selfish gratification, when the mind should be directed to the mercy and loving-kindness of God. God is displeased that his goodness, his constant care, his unceasing love, are not brought to mind on these anniversary occasions. RH November 13, 1894, par. 6 Christmas97.Let us, as stewards, do as Christ would do were he in our place. He did not spend money to please his fancy. From the least to the greatest, we are God’s stewards. What are we doing with his goods? A blessing will come to those who use their God-given means to accomplish good, instead of spending it in self-gratification. will soon be here,—a season of the year when much money is spent in buying presents. Let us practise self-denial and self-sacrifice. Money is greatly needed to place our sanitarium in running order. Let us work intelligently and earnestly, and spend in self-gratification nothing that is needed in the work of saving souls. Buy books upon present truth for those who need them. It is not ministers alone who are entrusted with talents and the work of ministering. Every child of God is pledged to do his utmost by self-denial to save the pence, the shillings, and the pounds. Put your money into the Lord’s treasury, that it may be invested in special lines of missionary work. We are to serve God with heart, and mind, and soul, and strength. Every capability is to be put into active exercise. Our talents are to be used to please God, not to glorify self. RH November 14, 1899, par. 6 Christmas99.Notice was given that I would speak on afternoon. At the time appointed we found a large company gathered in the church. I presented, verse by verse, part of the second chapter of Colossians. I have read this chapter many times, but it never seemed so impressive and encouraging as on this occasion. Please read this chapter carefully and prayerfully, and the Lord give you understanding. It is a treasure-house of encouragement to the believer. RH April 23, 1914, par. 12 evening, as we were humbling ourselves before God and earnestly pleading for deliverance, the light of Heaven seemed to shine upon us, and I was wrapt in a vision of God’s glory. It seemed that I was borne quickly from earth to heaven, where all was health, beauty, and glory. Strains of music fell upon my ear, melodious, perfect, and entrancing. I was permitted to enjoy this scene awhile before my attention was called to this dark world. Then my attention was called to things taking place upon this earth. [A portion of the instruction given during this memorable vision, urging the establishment of a health institution by the Seventh-day Adventist denomination, will be given in succeeding articles.]… Manuscript Releases Volume Three [Nos. 162-209], p. 128.3 (1) Christmas104.I suppose you will be interested to know how we spent . The day before , we went to town, and it was tediously cold. I suffered with cold. I never remember of its being much colder in Michigan. But Brother Moore’s people were living in a tent and were very uncomfortable. We were determined he should not live thus, and we commenced to bring about a change. We moved them into Sister Bahler’s old house, which was very open but better than a tent, for several nights. We had divided our bedding with them to keep them from suffering. Manuscript Releases Volume Two [Nos. 97-161], p. 235.1 (1) Christmas106.While these painstaking efforts were being made to get up the performances, meetings were being held of the deepest interest which should have engaged the attention, and which called for the presence of every soul lest they should lose something of the message the Master had sent to them. Now this has passed into eternity with its burden of record, and we are anxious to see the result of it. Will it make those who acted their part in it more spiritual-minded? Will it increase their sense of obligation to our heavenly Father who sent His Son into the world at such an infinite sacrifice to save fallen man from utter ruin? Was the mind awakened to grasp God because of His great love wherewith He has loved us? Manuscript Releases Volume Two [Nos. 97-161], p. 237.1 (1) Christmas108.Brother L had paid no tithes for two years…. I called all who needed help and the prayers of God’s people to come forward. Brother L and wife came forward and made their confessions. Brother L said he had not had any of the Spirit of God for some time, for he had been robbing God in tithes and offerings. He put $125.00 in the donation but he said he meant from henceforth to pay the Lord an honest tithe and to take up his past neglected work and make restitution to the Lord. Several others had similar testimony to bear. Manuscript Releases Volume Twelve [Nos. 921-999], p. 231.2 (1) and New Year celebrations can and should be held in behalf of those who are helpless. God is glorified when we give to help those who have large families to support. But no man who can earn his own livelihood has a right to live on the produce of others. The proverb, “The world owes me a living,” has in it the essence of falsehood, fraud, and robbery. The world owes no man a living who is able to work to gain a living for himself. Manuscript Releases Volume Fourteen [Nos. 1081-1135], p. 318.3 (1) Christmas morning we all took breakfast together—James Cornell; Florence and Clara, their two girls; Brother and Sister Moore and their three children; Sister Bahler and Etta, a girl living with them; and Sister Daniells, our cook, Father, and myself. We had a quarter of venison cooked, and stuffing. It was as tender as a chicken. We all enjoyed it very much. There is plenty of venison in market. I have not seen in years so much poverty as I have seen since I have come to Texas. Brother Moore has had poor health, and he has nothing—not a cent to get provisions with. We must help that family or they must suffer for the very necessities of life. I have put those flannel sheets [that] you sent me, on his bed. He is now unable to work because of pleurisy. I gave each of the Cornell girls a dress, which they needed very much. I cannot see want and misery and enjoy the comforts of life. James Cornell earns but little now. He has much suffering with rheumatism. Roxanna has been almost dead with asthma, but she is recovering now from a long siege of distressing illness. You cannot tell how I have worked early and late to get off the testimonies, and there is just as much to come yet, unwritten. Very important matter I am writing in regard to the sanitarium and college and office. I have great freedom in writing. Father is very kind, cheerful, and happy. His labor of preparing matter has been very taxing to him, but he has kept exercising, chopping wood and bringing it in, walking to [the] post office and back, one mile and a half in going and coming. He has physical exercise, aplenty of it; cares mostly for his own team. You see what a change has taken place with him. I am astonished at myself that I can do so much. I do not give credit to the climate, for I fail to see the especial advantages Texas has over Michigan except in so much fearful sickness, which is a disadvantage. Manuscript Releases Volume Fourteen [Nos. 1081-1135], p. 332.3 (1) My table is furnished with fruit in its season. For several months now we will have oranges, which we can get fresh from the trees. A few days ago Sara, Maggie, and your Aunt Ellen took the horse and carriage, and drove out about six miles, and helped to gat
her the beautiful yellow fruit. We purchased 28 dozen oranges. Several of our workers purchased some for themselves, besides what I got for the table. I also bought ten dozen lemons. Oranges and lemons are the only fresh fruit that we can get at this season of the year. By the time these are gone, early peaches will make their appearance. We will get them about Christmas-time.
Manuscript Releases Volume Twenty-one [Nos. 1501-1598], p. 223.5 (1) Christmas116.We do not want the cause of God to go crippling along for want of means that are needed upon the right hand and upon the left. We want the little rivulets to be turned into the treasury. Let every one bring in an offering to God. Don’t you think that this is the way to observe ? Don’t you think it is the best way, rather than that means should go into the treasuries of the ungodly? Manuscript Releases Volume Nineteen [Nos. 1360-1419], p. 74.2 (1) Christmas118.I have risen at three o’clock this morning to write you a few lines. [This letter refers to a dramatized program put on by the Battle Creek Sabbath school. The children wore costumes. Ella White, Mrs. White’s six-year-old granddaughter, was in the program, dressed to represent an angel.] I was pleased with the lighthouse, and the scene which had required so much painstaking effort was one which could have been made most impressive, but [it] failed to be made as forcible and striking as it might have been when it cost so much time and labor in preparing it. The part acted by the children was good. The reading was appropriate. Then if there had been good solid talk on that occasion in regard to children and teachers in the Sabbath schools laboring earnestly for the salvation of the souls of the children under your charge, presenting the most acceptable offering to Jesus, the gift of their own hearts, and impressive remarks, short and right to the point, [on] how they could do this, would it not have been in keeping with the work we have been trying to do in the church? Manuscript Releases Volume Nineteen [Nos. 1360-1419], p. 301.2 (1) While these painstaking efforts were being made to get up the performances, meetings were being held of the deepest interest which should have engaged the attention, and which called for the presence of every soul lest they should lose something of the message the Master had sent to them. Now this Christmas has passed into eternity with its burden of record, and we are anxious to see the result of it. Will it make those who acted their part in it more spiritually minded? Will it increase their sense of obligation to our heavenly Father who sent His Son into the world at such an infinite sacrifice to save fallen man from utter ruin? Was the mind awakened to grasp God because of His great love wherewith He has loved us? Manuscript Releases Volume Nineteen [Nos. 1360-1419], p. 302.1 (1) Christmas121.After dinner we went to the church, where we found a goodly number of people assembled, notwithstanding the fact that it was day. We praised the Lord that so many were desirous of hearing the truth. I continued my remarks on the second chapter of Colossians, and the Lord gave me freedom. My burden during the meetings of this Week of Prayer has been to impress the people that true service makes believers self-denying and self-sacrificing. They keep in view the need of individual holiness and consecration, that through the sanctification of the truth they may abound in works of benevolence to the uplifting of others. Manuscript Release No 1033, p. 52.1 (1) Eve I spoke in a good-sized hall to an intelligent congregation from Luke 10:25-28. I had freedom in speaking. There were a goodly number present and all listened with much attention.—Manuscript 53, 1890, 6-7 (Diary 16, pp. 420, 423). Sermons and Talks Volume Two, p. 127-28.3 (1) Now, when it comes to holidays, if a man has a penny or a shilling he must get on the cars and go and spend it somewhere. Now, we must understand we can make our own holidays, but we must not have a holiday because somebody is dead or somebody is alive or it is somebody’s birthday. Some say we have more holidays in America, but I know better. We have a few, New Year’s and Christmas and a few other holidays, but very few. The Ellen G. White 1888 Materials, p. 463.1 (1) Christmas125.Christmas126.The season is the occasion of making gifts one to another, but the richest gifts Christ has given to the world in Himself, that the world through Him might not perish but have eternal life. Gifts and offerings should be brought to Christ. The most precious gift of all is that of giving Him your heart without any reserve. How acceptable to Christ would be such an offering! Give to Jesus your whole heart, for Him to write His image and superscription upon it, and to send His beams of righteousness into it to be sent to the world through the living agent. Ellen G. White in Europe 1885-1887, By D. A. Delafield, p. 253.3 (60) ChristmasChristmas128.DESPRE ELLEN WHITE: Ellen White in her counsels about observance recognized that there was no Bible support for the celebration of the day, but she was practical enough to see that could not be passed by unnoticed by parents. The children would not understand. The wise procedure would be to direct the minds and hearts of the little ones to Christ, whose “birthday” was being celebrated. So she counseled them to bring their gifts to Jesus as the Wise Men did. Ellen G. White: Volume 2—The Progressive Years: 1862-1876, By Arthur L. White, p. 9.3 (57) Christmas130.DESPRE ELLEN WHITE: Elder and Mrs. Haskell were guests at he
r home, having come just after
. Haskell was suffering from an acute case of boils; he was immediately put under treatment at the Sanitarium and at Elmshaven. His wife served as nurse—a good one, Ellen White commented. Although he was supposed to remain in bed resting, he would often sneak out to visit with Ellen White. They had been close friends from early years, and there was much to talk about. “It has seemed like a revival of old times,” she said.—Letter 34, 1906. Ellen G. White: Volume 5—The Early Elmshaven Years: 1900-1905, By Arthur L. White, p. 51.5 (57) Christmas132.DESPRE ELLEN WHITE: The boys were amazed when Ellen White on meeting them, turned to her son and asked, “Willie, where are those things for the boys?” Willie produced two packages, each containing a toy train. The boys were delighted, and no doubt were careful to display them for their aunt’s benefit! Ellen and Willie enjoyed a good meal at the Rasmussens’ and Kings’, topped off with one of Mrs. Rasmussen’s Danish cakes, which Willie enjoyed so much that he asked for the recipe. He spiced the meal with a few interesting and humorous stories. At first the Rasmussen boys were afraid to laugh, but when they saw Ellen White smile and heard Elder White laugh at his own stories, they soon joined in. Sister White had no objection to a little sensible humor. Loud, hilarious laughter she detested. She was one who could weep. It was the message given to her by God on Day thirty-six years earlier that led to the… Ellen G. White: Volume 5—The Early Elmshaven Years: 1900-1905, By Arthur L. White, p. 309.3 (57) (49%) Christmas135.DESPRE ELLEN WHITE: It is a bright, crisp, frosty, sunny morning: an ideal day for midwinter in California. If we had any time to be merry, we could make it a merry .— Ibid., 58. Ellen G. White in Europe 1885-1887, By D. A. Delafield, p. 89.8 (60) Christmas137.DESPRE ELLEN WHITE: On Thursday, November 5, she continued her writing and made up for the rainy, disagreeable weather with a “very pleasant, profitable visit” with Brother L. Hansen. Hansen, a building contractor who had become an Adventist, was a key figure in the Christiania church at this time. He was in charge of the construction of the new publishing house and meeting hall, and he had also been the architect for the publishing house in Basel. As he and Mrs. White chatted through their interpreter, she shared with him some of her own pioneer experiences in the work. She also told him of her early health-reform visions and how these visions had led her to alter her eating habits. [The most important of the health-reform visions came to her on June 6, 1863. Cautions and warnings came from the lord, pinpointing the dangers to health present in man’s diet, women’s dress, and the drugging by the physicians of the time. Attention was called to a simple diet, the natural use of water, and to nature’s remedies generally. Later visions provided additional light from heaven. Her five books and numerous periodical articles on the subject made adventists the most health-conscious people in christendom. The day vision of 1865 in Rochester, New York, led church leaders to establish at Battle Creek in 1866 the first of a series of health centers that now belt the globe.] Ellen G. White in Europe 1885-1887, By D. A. Delafield, p. 250.2 (60) Christmas140.DESPRE ELLEN WHITE: On Sabbath, Day, Ellen White spoke for the official dedication of the little chapel. Appropriately Ellen G. White in Europe 1885-1887, By D. A. Delafield, p. 252.5 (60) Christmas142.DESPRE ELLEN WHITE: “We are now nearing the close of another year, and shall we not make these festal days opportunities in which to bring to God our offerings? I cannot say sacrifices, for we shall only be rendering to God that which is His already, and which He has only entrusted to us till He shall call for it. God would be well pleased if on , each church would have a tree on which shall be hung offerings, great and small, for these houses of worship. Ellen G. White in Europe 1885-1887, By D. A. Delafield, p. 254.3 (60) Christmas146.DESPRE ELLEN WHITE: All through the first three months of 1887, she concentrated her efforts on the Old Testament history. The plan was to finish the manuscript in Europe and have the book published and on the market by of 1887. But forces were at work that changed her plans. Ellen G. White in Europe 1885-1887, By D. A. Delafield, p. 269.2 (60) Christmas Day dedication of the church in 1886. In spite of her brief stay, she spoke four times and wrote 50 pages of notepaper to church members who needed counsel. La Conferinţa Generală de la Minneapolis, 1888, s-au luat următoarele decizii, cu privire la Crăciun:
COMMITTEE ON FINANCES

C. H. Jones, Harmon Lindsay, A. R. Henry, C. Eldridge, and A. T. Jones, with such state conference presidents as were present, constituted this committee. The following is their report of October 24, 25:–

Your committee appointed to take into consideration the financial wants of the cause, find that it requires not less than $50,000 a year to carry on the missions already established in different parts of the world. These missions have been established in the providence of God, and must be supported by free-will offerings from our people; and as we are permitted to carry the light of the third angel’s message to the world, and sustain this important work by our means and our prayers, we offer the following suggestions:–


Christmas Program

1. That a committee be appointed to make out a program of Christmas exercises to be sent to all our churches.

F. E. Belden, C. C. Lewis, and Jessie F. Waggoner were subsequently appointed.

Christmas Offerings

2. That on Monday evening, December 24, or on Christmas Day, our people everywhere assemble in their respective places of worship, prepared to manifest their love for God and interest in his work, by making liberal donations to foreign missions.

First-Day Offerings

WHEREAS, From all parts of the world, calls for work and laborers multiply, and missions in operation are suffering at present from lack of means and help; therefore, we recommend,–

3. That we herewith anew call the attention of our people everywhere to the provision made in the word of God in 1 Corinthians 16:2; also to the resolution passed at our last General Conference [number 4 of this report], and most heartily recommend its execution.

Channel for First-Day Offerings

A resolution concerning the channel through which the first-day offerings should reach the treasurer of the General Conference, having been referred to the Finance Committee, their report sustained the following recommendation, adopted at the session of 1887, the point in question being underlined:–

4. That our people everywhere literally carry out the advice of the apostle Paul in 1 Corinthians 16:2: „Upon the first day of the week let every one of you lay by
him in store, as God has prospered him.” As a weekly free-will offering in behalf of the foreign mission work, this is to be laid aside each week at home, and at the end of each quarter
to be paid to the tract society officers, [not to the church treasurer] to be sent to the general treasury. [Nov. 27, 1887; Nov. 4, 1888.]

Week of Prayer

WHEREAS, The plan adopted for the last two years, of having a week of prayer in December, with important instructions to be read each day to our people, has proved a great spiritual blessing to all our churches which have carried out the plans suggested; therefore we recommend,–

5. That December 15-22, 1888, be set apart by all our churches as a week of prayer.

Days of Fasting and Prayer

WHEREAS, We recognize that the harvest is great and consecrated laborers are few, and the cause is languishing for devoted persons to fill responsible positions in all branches of the work; therefore we recommend,–

6. That Wednesday and Thursday, December 19, 20, be set apart as days of humiliation, fasting, and prayer, that God may raise up faithful laborers, and sustain those already in the field. [Substitute for a resolution recommending that December 15 be a day of fasting and prayer.]

Day of Praise and Thanksgiving

7. That Sabbath, December 22, be observed as a day of thanksgiving and praise to God for blessings and mercies received during the past year; and that praise services be held in all our churches. [Substitute for a resolution recommending that December 22 be a day of fasting and prayer.]

Readings for Week of Prayer

8. That appropriate articles or Bible readings be prepared to be read in all our churches, setting forth more definitely the wants of the foreign missions, and the dangers and duties of the present time.

R. A. Underwood, R. M. Kilgore, and E. W. Farnsworth were afterward appointed as a committee to secure readings.

9. That a council of church, Sabbath-school, and Tract and Missionary officers be held on Sabbath, December 8, prayerfully to consider this matter, and to lay definite plans to carry out the same successfully.

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